WORKSHOPS


Workshop Fees

FULL DAY WORKSHOPS: $620

Workshop registration fees are in Australian dollars and inclusive of GST. 

Workshop tickets are charged per person and are not included in registration fees and are an additional expense. The option to purchase tickets will be displayed after you have selected a registration type on the registration form. For further information on how to register, click here. Already registered? Please refer to the link in your registration confirmation email to gain access back into your registration to make amendments.


Sunday 15 September 2024

FULL DAY WORKSHOPS

Full day workshops will be held at the Adelaide Convention Centre, Sunday 15 September 2024, 9.00am - 5.00pm.

WORKSHOP 1:  Advances in PFAS Analytical Chemistry, Data Interpretation, and Effective Management of PFAS in Groundwater 

WORKSHOP 2: Site Characterization, Mass Flux, Incremental Sampling Methodology, Artificial Intelligence in Site CleanUp, and Balancing Legacy and Emerging Contaminants In Site CleanUp

WORKSHOP 3: Human Health Risk Assessment – the How to Guide


WORKSHOP 1:  Advances in PFAS Analytical Chemistry, Data Interpretation, and Effective Management of PFAS in Groundwater 
Sunday 15 September 2024
Location: City Room 1, Adelaide Convention Centre
9.00am - 5.00pmPresenters: Jeff Gamlin, Jens Blotevogel, PhD, Christian Zwiener, PhD, Chuck Newell, PhD

About this workshop:

This full day workshop is divided into two sessions. The morning session will focus on recent advances in the analytical methods for detecting per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and will provide a framework for assessing PFAS data when developing conceptual site models (CSMs).  Current analytical methods allow an understanding of the potentially 1,000’s of PFAS present at a given site.  However, without a framework to make sense of these complicated data, it can be difficult to assess how the analytical results relate to the CSM.

In the afternoon session, presenters will focus on how PFAS pose an emerging challenge in groundwater remediation, potentially exceeding the impact of hydrocarbon and chlorinated solvent plumes. Unlike traditional contaminants, PFAS differ in source, chemistry, fate, transport, and toxicology, necessitating distinct management strategies in groundwater remediation. The unique properties of PFAAs greatly limit the available in-situ soil and groundwater remediation options.


Why Attend?

This workshop has been developed in response to the critical need for regulators and practitioners to share experiences to create standard practices and address knowledge gaps, in advances in PFAS analytical chemistry, effective management of PFAS in groundwater, fate and transport, modelling and remediation alternatives. As well as offering technical lessons from the study of past projects, the course offers semi-structured discussions, problem-solving and personal interactions that give participants deep insight into PFAS Advanced. 

The workshop will offer invaluable networking opportunities for practitioners, regulators and researchers. Delegates will get the opportunity to build connections with instructors as well as with their fellow delegates.

This workshop will provide an opportunity to put your organisation at the forefront of best practices in dealing with PFAS.


DOWNLOAD FULL WORKSHOP DETAILS AND PRESENTER BIOS HERE



WORKSHOP 2:  Site Characterization, Mass Flux, Incremental Sampling Methodology, Artificial Intelligence in Site CleanUp, and Balancing Legacy and Emerging Contaminants In Site CleanUp
Sunday 15 September 2024
Location: City Room 2, Adelaide Convention Centre
9.00am - 5.00pmPresenters: Naji Akladiss P.E.; CQE, Dr Chuck Newell, Susan E. Schow MPH, Jeremy Musson

About this workshop:

This full-day workshop is divided into two sessions.

The morning session will focus on Site Characterization and Mass Flux/Mass Discharge.

The behaviour of contaminants in the subsurface is governed by several inter-related fate and transport processes that may vary in both space and time. In this training course, we will present the conceptual basis for several of these processes, such as physical and chemical properties of the contaminant, and then demonstrate approaches that can be used to calculate the distribution of contaminants between the solid, liquid, and gas phases. Due to the emergence of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) as contaminants of concern, we will also discuss adsorption processes that occur at phase interfaces (e.g., air-water), which can be particularly important for compounds that exhibit surface active properties. These processes will be described as equations that can incorporated into mathematical models to evaluate the relative importance of different processes or predict the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface

The second portion of this session will focus on contaminant mass flux and mass discharge.  Most regulatory and management decisions regarding contaminated groundwater sites are primarily based on contaminant concentrations. Such decisions can be improved by also considering contaminant mass flux and mass discharge. The information provided will be valuable for virtually all aspects of contaminated site management.

The afternoon session is Incremental Sampling Methodology and Artificial Intelligence.

Incremental Sampling Methodology (ISM) is a statistically supported technique for assessing the mean contaminant concentration in soil, sediment, and other environmental media. Environmental professionals have demonstrated that the methodology can be a useful tool to represent site conditions when applied to bulk particulate materials such as soil, sediment, or waste.

ISM is increasingly used in the environmental field to sample contaminants in soil. Proponents have found that the sampling density afforded by collecting many increments, together with the disciplined processing and subsampling of the combined increments, in most cases yields more consistent and reproducible results than those obtained by more traditional (discrete) sampling approaches.

This AI short course will offer a comprehensive exploration of large language models (LLMs) and their diverse applications in environmental science. Beginning with an introductory overview, participants will embark on a journey to understand the foundational principles underpinning LLMs, tracing their evolutionary trajectory and examining their far-reaching influence across various fields. Through interactive discussions and real-world examples, attendees will gain valuable insights into the significance and potential of LLMs in addressing complex environmental challenges, setting the stage for an enriching learning experience.


Why Attend?

This workshop has been developed in response to the critical need for regulators and practitioners to share experiences to create standard practices and address knowledge gaps, Advances in site characterization, chemicals and physical properties of contaminants, Mass Flux – Mass Discharge measurements, Effective management of contaminated sites, and Fate and Transport. As well as offering technical lessons from the study of past projects, the course offers semi-structured discussions, problem-solving and personal interactions that give participants deep insight into site characterization and mass flux.

ISM and AI sessions of the workshop have been developed to address the need for a more comprehensive and cost-effective sampling methodology to address soil heterogeneity and how to use artificial intelligence to develop sampling plans to address risk assessment and site remediation.

The workshop will offer invaluable networking opportunities for practitioners, regulators, and researchers. Delegates will get the opportunity to build connections with instructors as well as with their fellow delegates.

This workshop will provide an opportunity to put your organisation at the forefront of best practices in dealing with contaminated sites.


DOWNLOAD FULL WORKSHOP DETAILS AND PRESENTER BIOS HERE

WORKSHOP 3:  Human Health Risk Assessment – the How to Guide
Sunday 15 September 2024
Location: City Room 3, Adelaide Convention Centre
9.00am - 5.00pmPresenters: Dr Jackie Wright, Dr Belinda Goldsworthy, Prof. Mengfang Chen

About this workshop:

This one-day Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) workshop provides a ‘step-by-step’ guide to the HHRA process and provides information and resources to complete HHRAs in accordance with Australian recommended guidance. The workshop focuses on the technical aspects of HHRA models to reveal their mysteries and uncover the key influencing parameters that drive human health risk. An interactive forum is provided and encouraged to allow attendees to engage with the presenters and other workshop participants during group exercises and discussions. Case studies and project examples will be provided to illustrate the key concepts.

The workshop will benefit those wishing to conduct, interpret and/or review HHRAs.

In the afternoon, attendees will learn HHRA approaches adopted in China and the UK to understand the similarities and differences in international methodologies.


Why Attend?
The workshop is aimed at people who have no prior experience performing HHRAs but it is assumed that attendees will have some knowledge of the contaminated land industry such as Tier 1 screening assessments and assessment of contaminated sites. The workshop should be of interest to regulators, industry professionals and consultants who are required to perform, review and interpret HHRAs. Attendees are required to bring a calculator to perform the workshop exercises

DOWNLOAD FULL WORKSHOP DETAILS AND PRESENTER BIOS HERE